Shadow

CyberJournalist.net in the News: 2002

Poynter Online, Nov. 20, 2002, "The Digital-Era Cartoonist"
"I adore the work of Mark Fiore, the San
Francisco-based political cartoonist who specializes in animated Flash cartoons.
He won the Online News Association’s 2002 Online Journalism Award for Commentary
and was a finalist in the Creative Use of the Medium category.
Cyberjournalist.net
‘s Jonathan Dube has
an
interview
with Fiore. Excerpt: "The medium is so new that editors don’t
immediately think of animated political cartoons. The cartoon syndicates
reinforce this by shoving huge collections of cartoons repurposed from the print
world down online editors throats." — Steve Outing


OnlineJournalism.com, Nov. 20, 2002, "Political cartoons come of age
online"
"Technology doesn’t make the cartoon, explained Mark Fiore, the recent
winner of the 2002 Online Journalism Award for commentary and finalist in the
Creative Use of the Medium category, in a Cyberjournalist Q&A session. Fiore
began his career doodling as a traditional print political cartoonist, dabbling
in a short, stifling stint with a major daily before high-tailing it out to work
full-time on animated cartoons. For Fiore, the most important factor in making
an animated editorial cartoon effective is having a strong opinion about a
topic, though he admits that technological advances greatly enhance the
potential for sound and music that add a vast depth and emotion to the
animation. Fiore said he believes that the biggest problem with online news
sites is that they are treated as merely a place to duplicate the newspaper.
Case in point: a bad precedent was set with repurposed print cartoons being
shoved online under the rubric of them subsequently being an online cartoon
without truly taking advantage of the medium. Still, he stressed, technology is
not what gives the cartoon its zing; ‘The cartoon, animated or static, still
comes down to the idea.’ — Andrea Hulser


Chicago Tribune, Oct. 30, 2002, "Taking Google News out for a test drive"
 "It basically gives people a quick glance of what news sites around the world
are determining are the top stories," said Jonathan Dube, publisher of
CyberJournalist.net, a site that explores the intersection of technology and
media…. Many times, links refer to the same Reuters or Associated Press
account posted by different sites. The sheer volume of links can make it harder
to sort through and find a unique take, let alone the most interesting one. Dube
said without the ability to sift out repeats, "right now, it’s just kind of a
novelty." … Dube said the search engine is more powerful than its competitors
and probably the most useful part of the site." — Raoul Mowatt


OnlineJournalism.com, Oct. 14, 2002, "Creators discuss online memorial…"
"As the debate continues over the physical memorial to be built in honor of
Sept. 11 victims, the creators of an online, sonic memorial revealed
behind-the-scenes information in
an
interview
with Jonathan Dube of CyberJournalist.net. Documentarians Alison
Cornyn and Sue Johnson created The Sonic Memorial Project, recruiting
journalists, artists and historians to collect sounds reflecting the life of the
World Trade Center. Cornyn and Johnson told Dube that they were intrigued by the
challenge of a Web site dominated by sound rather than visuals. They encouraged
the site’s visitors to "explore, experiment, and listen" in order to experience
the capabilities of the Sonic Browser, which provides a non-linear experience
for users. The site is an interactive means of teaching and documenting history,
and users can contribute their own stories by contacting the project through the
"Add a Sound" feature." – Alexia Loskutoff


Online Journalism Review, Sept. 11, "The Sept. 11 Media
Frenzy"
"Also of note: Jonathan Dube?s well-organized

CyberJournalist.net
guide to coverage (now housed by the American Press
Institute)…" – Staci D. Kramer


E-Media Tidbits, Sept. 10, 2002, "9/11,
and Nothing But 9/11
"
"Have you noticed that the news
media (especially in the U.S.) is making a bit of a big deal about tomorrow’s
anniversary of the U.S. terrorist attacks? Of course you noticed, unless you
live on another planet or somehow have managed to unplug yourself from all
media. If you’re not yet burned out on the anniversary coverage, both
Poynter.org and the American Press Institute are compiling lists of some of the
best media coverage. API’s

CyberJournalist.net site
categorizes the best types of coverage. And at
Poynter.org (publisher of this weblog), there’s a "Chronicling
the Coverage
" weblog listing an assortment of great 9/11 coverage,
contributed by Poynter staff and faculty, as well as Poynter.org readers." –
Steve Outing


OnlineJournalism.com, Sept. 8, "More D.I.Y. Web journalism
after Sept. 11"
"People who experienced the events of September 11 firsthand turned to the
Internet to report what they saw, resulting in a great deal of do-it-yourself
journalism online, CyberJournalist.net reported. According to a recent study by
the Pew Internet & American Life Project, after the tragedy many first-person
articles appeared on various Web sites which had never before posted news of any
kind. The study warned that much of this journalism is based on personal
account, rather than verifiable facts. Still, the surge of people turning to the
Internet for additional news has continued throughout the year since the
attacks, CyberJournalist.net reported." – Erin Auerbach


Associated Press, August 26, 2002, "Media Industry News"
"The Media Center at the American Press Institute in Reston, Va., and
CyberJournalist.net have formed a publishing alliance to jointly encourage
better online and multi-platform convergence journalism. CyberJournalist.net is
a Web site for journalists that focuses on the Internet, media convergence and
new technologies."


InstaPundit.com, August 26, 2002, "Officially
a CyberJournalist
…"

"HEY, I’M OFFICIALLY A
CYBERJOURNALIST!
It says so right on CyberJournalist.Net, and I don’t see how you could get more
official than that." — Glenn Reynolds


E-Media Tidbits, August 21, 2002, "Cyberjournalist.net,
API Hook Up
"
"Jonathan Dube’s Cyberjournalist.net website, a resource for the online
journalism world that covers the Internet, media convergence, and new
technologies, has entered into an agreement with the American Press Institute to
become a service of API’s The Media Center. Cyberjournalist.net also will be
incorporated into other information and training services produced by the
Center, according to its director, Andrew Nachison. Dube will continue as editor
and publisher of Cyberjournalist.net and becomes a senior editor for The Media
Center (AND keeps his "day job" as technology editor for MSNBC.com), and
Nachison becomes editor-at-large. (Dube also co-writes a regular column, Web
Tips, for Poynter.org, publisher of this weblog. Where does he find the time for
all this?)" – Steve Outing


OnlineJournalism.com, August 21, 2002, "CyberJournalist.net and API form
publishing alliance"
"CyberJournalist.net and The Media Center at the American Press Institute
have forged a publishing alliance to "encourage better online and multi-platform
convergence journalism." CyberJournalist.net will become a service of The Media
Center, which offers training for online publishing companies and executives.
"The site will remain much the same, but you’ll notice a few changes: a new
banner, and a new resources section that now combines the jobs, books, education
and other resources pages," explained a message on the CyberJournalist.net
homepage. Jonathan Dube will remain CyberJournalist.net’s editor-in-chief and
publisher and become an editor-at-large at The Media Center. Media Center
Director Andrew Nachison will become an editor-at-large at CyberJournalist.net."
– Ellen Horowitz


OnlineJournalism.com, August 1, 2002, "CyberJournalist.net adds
convergence section"

"CyberJournalist.net debuted a new Convergence Coverage section on Wednesday
that offers "tips and articles on the converging of media." The new feature was
announced at the bottom of a blurb about Southern Methodist University’s new $18
million digital newsroom, which aims to train students for convergence by
teaching them how to prepare stories across print, broadcast and online
platforms. "This convergence of different mediums is clearly the trend that
journalism and the big media companies are following," said SMU journalism
professor Chris Peck. "With that in mind, CyberJournalist.net has begun tracking
the latest convergence headlines in a new section," read a message on the site.
– Ellen Horowitz


Poynter.org, July 18, 2002, "Weblogs: Put Them to Work in Your Newsroom"
"The Weblog Blog on CyberJournalist.net. Jon Dube keeps track of news of the
blogging world in this weblog, focusing specifically on weblogging as
journalism." – Steve Outing


WriteThinking.net, July 1, 2002, "Pogo’s Web Watch: CyberJournalist.net"
"If you want to know something, ask a journalist. No matter who you are, or what
you’re looking for, ask a journalist.  Jonathan Dube has his act together,
so take a look at it. He collects interesting headlines to make your morning
brighter. For learning how to write stories that sell, then learn about Online
Storytelling Formats and find out what readers want. Learn how stories are
packaged for news media and benefit from the papers given. Examine the samples
posted for clickable interactives and slideshow stories as examples for your
own.  Get writing tips from pros and sign-up for the e-mail newsletter.
     "Need help with something? Can’t tell whether a site is
trustworthy? Need to convert a TV script into a web format? Here are tools that
every writer can use.      Learn how to use a reverse
directory and find out about the Wayback machine to set your surfing skills on
the edge of the cyber universe and get a glance at cybertime with the view of
the Hubble telescope. Need information fast? Learn sharp searching skills and go
on a Treasure Hunt.
     "Footloose, in debt, and need a job? Investigate the
top four job sites. If they don’t fit your needs, there’s only 29 more for
General Aid and 18 for specific companies. Quit procrastinating, click!
     "Wannabe educated, cerebral, and intellectual? Improve
your professional skills? Get down to business and check his professional
resources.
     "Got a story? Something buzzing in your ears about the
town? Need a model to build your story on? Enter please the Great Works gallery
where you can study the masterpieces of good writing.  Searching for the
Holy Grail? Then study storytelling forms. Find out everything about anybody who
uses the net and what they read. If you need something, find a journalist: the
word really means a journal of lists.


American Journalism Review, July 2002, "Journalistic Blogging"
"Meanwhile, a growing number of journalists are blogging on their own time.
(See cyberjournalist.net/cyberjournalists.html
for a directory.)" – Barb Palser


CHOICE Magazine: Current Reviews for Academic Libraries,
July 2002.
"Online journalism is a different world from traditional journalism,
attracting readers looking for the quick fix, the equivalent of a headlines
happy meal with the Internet as the toy. This new news is being written and
designed by cyberjournalists, mostly young professionals in tune with the times
and the technology, who offer a nice story, tight on insight and light on words,
with eye-grabbing graphics, a total package that gets the point across. This
site caters to these online journalists by focusing on the Internet and new
technologies, always looking to see how technology is affecting journalism. The
founder and publisher of Cyberjournalist.net, Jonathan Dube, is the technology
editor for MSNBC.com and has a strong background in journalism.
Cyberjournalist.net appears to deliver on its promise of "recognizing those who
do great work and helping those who don’t." A banner on the left side of every
page takes visitors to various sections of the site. Headlines present links to
articles about the intersection of news and the Internet. The SuperSearch page
is a combination of popular search engines and ready-reference sites. The most
useful section of the site for young journalists is the Tips page, featuring
Dube’s "Writing News Online" and advice from numerous others. And at Great Works
Gallery, visitors can see examples of online news done right. Readers can leave
feedback on the site or recommend good online news for Dube’s consideration.
This site is recommended for lower- and upper-division undergraduates and for
professionals." – R. L. Abbott, University of Evansville


Christian Science Monitor, June 20, 2002, "You, too, can
have a voice in ‘blogland’"
"A list of journalists with blogs can be found at cyberjournalist.net."
– Kim Campbell


The (Cleveland) Plain Dealer, June 6, 2002, "Site of the Day"
"The site of the day is

www.cyberjournalist.net/greatwork.html
.
This site has created an online gallery of award-winning articles written
exclusively for the Web. Among the examples is the winner of the 2001 Society of
Professional Journalists’ Sigma Delta Chi Online Deadline Reporting award,
"Shooting of Tampa Police Officer," from Tampa Bay Online. The authors included
video, audio and photos in a breaking news story about the shooting of a Tampa,
Fla., police officer. Several of the winners were photo essays about the
aftermath of Sept. 11 in New York City. Others came from familiar names in
journalism who are making use of a new medium: Bill Moyers won an award for best
service journalism for his "On Our Own Terms: Moyers on Dying," PBS.org, based
on a Moyers special TV report. New Web sites also were represented in this
category, including ThemeParkInsider.com for its "Accident Watch" series, a
guide to safety at amusement parks across the United States."


E-Media Tidbits, June 4, 2002, "Keeping
Up With Weblogs
"

"If you’re interested in tracking the exciting field of weblogs (and why
wouldn’t you be?), there are now some excellent resources. In this weblog,
E-Media Tidbits, we often report on weblog trends. But if you want more, there’s
also Cyberjournalist.net’s The Weblog Blog page by Jon Dube. And don’t forget
John Hiler’s Microcontent News. (Hiler yesterday posted a list of "big media"
that are now publishing weblogs, in response to yesterday’s addition by
MSNBC.com of several weblogs.)" – Steve Outing




Edmonton Journal, May 31, "Sites to see"
"Cyberjournalist.net has created an online gallery of award-winning articles
written exclusively for the Web. Among the examples is the winner of the 2001
Society of Professional Journalists Sigma Delta Chi Online Deadline Reporting
award, "Shooting of Tampa Police Officer," from Tampa Bay Online. The authors
included video, audio and photos in a breaking news story about the shooting of
a Tampa police officer. Several of the winners were photo essays about the
aftermath of Sept. 11 in New York City. Others came from familiar names in
journalism who are making use of a new medium: Bill Moyers won an award for best
service journalism for his "On Our Own Terms: Moyers on Dying," PBS.org, based
on a Bill Moyers special TV report. "The judges said they found the guide for
doctors on how to understand and handle diversity especially compelling," the
site explains. New Web sites were also represented in this category, including
ThemeParkInsider.com for its "Accident Watch" series, a guide to safety at
amusement parks across the U.S. World Wide Web:

http://www.cyberjournalist.net/greatwork.html
"


Newsbytes News Network, May 9, 2002, "Award-Winning Online Journalism"
"Cyberjournalist.net has created an online gallery of award-winning articles
written exclusively for the Web. Among the examples is the winner of the 2001
Society of Professional Journalists Sigma Delta Chi Online Deadline Reporting
award, "Shooting of Tampa Police Officer," from Tampa Bay Online. The authors
included video, audio and photos in a breaking news story about the shooting of
a Tampa police officer. Several of the winners were photo essays about the
aftermath of Sept. 11 in New York City. Others came from familiar names in
journalism who are making use of a new medium: Bill Moyers won an award for best
service journalism for his "On Our Own Terms: Moyers on Dying," PBS.org, based
on a Bill Moyers special TV report. "The judges said they found the guide for
doctors on how to understand and handle diversity especially compelling," the
site explains. New Web sites were also represented in this category, including
ThemeParkInsider.com for its "Accident Watch" series, a guide to safety at
amusement parks across the U.S. World Wide Web:

http://www.cyberjournalist.net/greatwork.html
"


Poynter.org, May 7, 2002, "Radio & Online Writing Help"
"Many of you know that my co-columnist and friend Jon Dube runs
Cyberjournalist.net, the best site for online journalism resources. Among the
many things you can gather there are tips about online writing. Tips from Dube
himself — ‘Writing News Online – A Dozen Tips,’ ‘Online Storytelling Forms,’
‘Online Thinking’ — and from others: ‘Converting TV Scripts for the Web,’
‘Thinking Outside the Templates,’ ‘Web Writers’ Mistakes.’ Even if you aren’t a
cyberjournalist, you should visit his site to learn about trends affecting our
craft." – Sreenath Sreenivasan


OnlineJournalism.com, April 24, 2002, "A Weblog about blogs"
"Cyberjournalist.net has added a Weblog Blog to the site. The new section
offers links to stories written about ‘Weblogging as journalism’ and goes back
to two May 2001 articles that appeared in the Online Journalism Review. Since
then, a slew of articles have been written about the trend, most recently in
Howard Kurtz’s April 22 column. Cyberjournalist.net also has an extensive list
of blogs and personal sites that are relevant to online journalists." – Ellen
Horowitz


The Florida Times-Union, April 20, 2002, "News Fools"
"April Fools’ Day is always full of bogus news stories and broadcast pranks.
Review several of this year’s tall tales at this site which includes Napster’s
plans to buy Microsoft, the latest on the moon’s green cheese and a newspaper
story in Buckley, W.Va., covering an edict that all dogs had to be out of the
county by noon:


www.cyberjournalist.netfeatures/aprilfools.htm
."


Atlanta Journal-Constitution, April 14, "Netwatcher: Net Guide"
Also: Cox News Service, April 15, "Netwatcher: Net Guide"
"CyberJournalist: April Fools’ Day was full of bogus news stories and
broadcast pranks. Catch up on this year’s tall tales at CyberJournalist.net’s
collection. It includes Napster’s plans to buy Microsoft, the latest on the
moon’s green cheese and a newspaper story in Buckley, W.Va., covering an edict
that all dogs had to be out of the county by noon:


www.cyberjournalist.net/features/aprilfools.htm
."


USA Today, April 5, 2002, "Hot site of the day"
"April 1st comes and goes without any real record of the pranks played by
the world’s media. Not this year. CyberJournalist offers summaries and links to
this week’s funniest Fourth Estate foolery, as well as the top 10 April Fool’s
Day hoaxes of all time."


Online Journalism Review, April 3, 2002, "Independent publishers thrive
amidst closures of large scale news sites"
‘There are countless such sites out there,’ says Jonathan Dube, technology
editor for MSNBC.com and founder of the reporters’ resource site
cyberjournalist.net…. ‘Most of these sites are done as a labor of love by the
owners, often at a financial loss,’ says Dube….MSNBC.com’s Dube suggests that
the New Economy crash may well prove to be a boomlet for a new round of lone Web
publishers: ‘It’s even possible that with the demise of many small online
publications, those who can’t find work online will start their own Weblogs or
solo publications simply because they want an outlet.’ – Emmanuelle Richard



Columbia Journalism Review, March/April 2002, "Technology Corner"
"CyberJouralist SuperSearch:

http://www.cyberjournalist.net/supersearch.

This is the latest addition to Cyberjournalist.net, a site run as a labor of
love by MSNBC technology editor Jonathan Dube. It brings together on one page
most of the search boxes that journalists (and others) find useful. The distinct
searches you can conduct include Web search engines, U.S. government statistics
and medical dictionaries." – Sreenath Sreenivasan


OnlineJournalism.com, March 16, 2002, "Stats tell journalists what readers
want"
"One of the advantages of online journalism is that it generates statistics,
allowing writers, reporters and editors to see what readers are looking at.
Several sites have made this information available to the public on the Web.
ABCNews.com, NYTimes.com and CNN.com list the most e-mailed stories in a 24-hour
period. MSNBC.com lets readers rate stories on a scale from one to seven and
keeps a tally of readers’ top ten picks. Yahoo tracks the most viewed stories
and pictures on its U.S. site as well as the most visited stories in several
European nations, Canada and China. ‘Think of these as reader-generated front
pages,’ wrote MSNBC.com Technology editor and CyberJournalist.net founder
Jonathan Dube. ‘Reading them is like reading news sites where the readers are
making the editorial decisions.’" – Ellen Horowitz


E-Media Tidbits, February 5, 2002, "What Every Online Newsroom Needs"
"Most of the time I’m hearing about how online news sites are cutting back
on any funding of truly innovative, experimental story-telling efforts. Sad news
comes from the folks at the Helsinki Sanomat that their Webortage team, creators
of some truly mold busting story forms, is being disbanded. (Webortage packages
are at the bottom left of the page.) And so it is with great good tidings that I
learned of Tom Regan’s new position at the Christian Science Monitor. He is
"executive producer" of a new unit designed to produce one original Web-produced
story every two weeks and a major package every month. One of their first
efforts, My Fellow Americans, was picked by Jonathan Dube in his Cyberjournalist
report as his ‘Great Work of the Month.’" – Nora Paul


E-Media Tidbits, January 3, 2002, "The Top 10 Online News Stories"
"Cyberjournalist.net’s Jonathan Dube has compiled a list of the top 10
stories in the online news world. No. 1 (of course): Sept. 11 and the ensuing
onslaught of online traffic to news websites. At No. 4, Dube cites the
weblogging craze (of which we’re fond here on E-Media Tidbits). Also take note
of this page, which handily links to 17 year-end news packages by major news
sites (and points to a handful of year-end news industry reflections, including
my own)." – Steve Outing


E-Media Tidbits, January 16, 2002, "Breaking Politics News, Anonymously"
"While online media has had a rough ride, there are still signs of hope for
original journalism on the Web. As reported in CyberJournalist.net, the sites
PoliticsNY.com and PoliticsNJ.com have been scooping local media and making
waves recently. Really interesting: the writers won’t reveal their identities."
– Steve Outing

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